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Needle biopsy of the breast
Needle biopsy of the breast


Intraductal papilloma
Intraductal papilloma


Abnormal discharge from the nipple
Abnormal discharge from the nipple


Intraductal papilloma

Definition:

Intraductal papilloma is a small, noncancerous (benign) tumor that grows in a milk duct of the breast.



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Intraductal papilloma occurs most often in women ages 35 - 55. The causes and risk factors are unknown.



Symptoms:

Signs and tests:

The health care provider might feel a small lump under the nipple, but this lump cannot always be felt. There may be discharge from the breast.

A mammogram often does not show papillomas. Ultrasound may be helpful.

Other tests include:

  • A breast biopsy to rule out cancer
  • An examination of discharge released from the breast to see if the cells are cancerous (malignant)
  • An x-ray with contrast dye injected into the affected duct (ductogram)


Treatment:

The involved duct is removed with surgery and the cells are checked for cancer (biopsy ).



Support Groups:

There may be support groups for women with breast disease in your area. Ask your doctor or other health care provider for a recommendation.



Expectations (prognosis):

The outcome is excellent for people with one tumor. People with many tumors, or who get them at an early age may have an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly if they have a family history of cancer or there are abnormal cells in the biopsy.



Complications:

Complications of surgery can include bleeding, infection, and anesthesia risks. If the biopsy shows cancer, you may need further surgery.



Calling your health care provider:

Call your health care provider if you notice any breast discharge or a breast lump.



Prevention:

There is no known way to prevent intraductal papilloma. Breast self-examination and screening mammograms can help detect the disease early.




Review Date: 11/16/2011
Reviewed By: Daniel N. Sacks, MD, FACOG. Obstetrics & Gynecology in Private Practice, West Palm Beach, FL. Review provided by Verimed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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